Support Sherwood



Robin Hood

Sherwood Forest is forever associated in legend, song and story with Robin Hood.

He and his merry band of outlaws have inspired upwards of 90 movies and TV series, not to mention novels, plays and stage shows.

Trails and Tours

NSDC Robin Hood Trail

  • Meet Robin Hood and discover the truth of the ‘Hooded Man’! Follow the trail of historical facts and learn how simple ballads over 700 years old grew into one of the greatest stories ever told. It’s number 1 on TripAdvisor too!

Robin Hood Tours & Bespoke Guiding

Meet Robin Hood (portrayed by award winning local tour guide Ezekiel Bone) and discover the truth of the ‘Hooded Man’ in an entertaining and informative tour of the city of Nottingham.  Follow the trail of historical facts and learn how simple ballads over 700 years old grew into one of the greatest stories ever told.  As you visit places associated with Robin Hood, you will also see the town’s key sites of interest and learn about its history and culture.

Step Into Legend

Visit Nottinghamshire to explore for yourself some of the places associated with the Robin Hood legend, from the famous Major Oak in Sherwood Forest National Nature Reserve to lesser known spots such as Robin Hood’s Cave at Creswell Crags.  Here are some ideas:

Walk in Thieves Wood and Harlow Wood south of Mansfield – today Forestry Commission plantations but in older times native woodland dominated by oak and birch rather than conifers.  It’s easy to imagine how travellers might have felt back in the days before electric light, tarmac and banks, when all money required for your journey had to be carried with you and a rustle in the leaves might threaten a wild boar or a robber!  Close by is Fountaindale – in legend the place where Robin fought Little John on a bridge over a stream.

Pose for a photo by the famous Robin Hood statue outside the walls of Nottingham Castle.  The legendary stronghold of the Sheriff of Nottingham may not look as you’d expect from the Robin Hood movies.  Nottingham’s medieval castle and Royal palace was destroyed by fire during the 1831 Reform Act Riots.  But parts – the gatehouse, and fascinating underground dungeons – remain.  Were outlaws once held in these gloomy cells?

 

Get Sociable